LANCASTER
WHITHORN
CARLISLE
CARTMELL
FURNESS
TOGETHER
CUMBRIA AND BORDERS

c

u

m

b

r

I

a

 

c

u

m

b

r

I

a

 

c

u

m

b

r

I

A

 

c

u

m

b

r

I

A

 

c

u

m

b

r

I

a

Jesus  and  Mary and the Disciples

 

Cumbria Christianity

St Cuthbert
687

BORN about 634. Cuthbert became a monk, first at Melrose, then Ripon, then as prior of Lindisfarne. He grew up in the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria which then stretched north to the Forth and west into Cumbria and south-west Scotland. The church he knew, was a meeting-place of influences; on the one hand, from Celtic missionaries from lona and ultimately from Ireland, and on the other, from the church founded at Canterbury from Rome in 597.

One. of Cuthbert's first tasks as prior of Lindisfarne was to persuade his fellow monks to conform to the Roman practices adopted in Northumbria at the Synod of Whitby in 631. As prior he also undertook great preaching tours, winning many vvrrth his gentle, loving manner and personal austerity. In 676 Cuthbert became a hermit on the island of Inner Fame, but in 685 this interlude of solitary refreshment of the soul ended. He was called to be bishop of Lindisfarne and again
travelled across the north of England, preaching and ministering to the people. At the very end of his life he returned to his hermitage, where he died on 20th March 687.

Cuthbert's contacts with the area which is now the Diocese of Carlisle began in life and continued after death. Much of the area probably came Nithin the Diocese of Lindisfarne. Cuthbert visited Carlisle on several occasions, and is known to have ordained priests there. The former parish of
St Cuthbert Without may represent some of the land given by Ecgfrith, king of Northumbria, when Cuthbert became bishop. The land of Cartmel was also made over to him.